Jun
1

Banks In The Dark Over $15 Billion of Promised Rosneft M&A business

Banks that assist Russian oil company Rosneft finance its $55 billion buyout of rival have been left waiting for their payback a share in $15 billion in asset sales projected to follow the deal.

State oil company Rosneft’s takeover of this year aimed to generate a major oil group producing more oil than however it also tightened the Russian government’s grip on the country’s energy sector.

The asset sales promised by Rosneft Chief Executive Igor Sechin would offload less-profitable businesses to turn the company into the major oil player the CEO has stated he wants it to be. The delay demonstrate Rosneft has a lot on its plate integrating and that the sales are on the back burner.

Rosneft had dangled the juicy divestment mandates at the banks in exchange for a $29.8 billion loan the largest in Russia’s history on good terms, all the lending banks are waiting. We thought asset sales and refinancing bonds would kick start straight following the closing.

Rosneft’s slow motion is annoying the banks as they would earn fat fees from advising the oil giant on the asset sales this year, which would assist boost M&A revenues in an otherwise arid deal making landscape.

M&A activity across all sectors is losing 7 percent in Europe, Africa and Middle East since January partly due to the impact of the euro zone crisis on business confidence.

Banks that uphold big balance sheets throughout the financial crisis have been hoping to use this muscle to win lucrative M&A advisory business from competitor which had to shrink partly to meet tough European capital rules.

Banks frequently use their balance sheets to offer cheap loans to corporate clients to secure higher margin business such as share or bond issues or M&A work.

Big balance sheets helped Deutsche Bank and Barclays to achieve number 2 and 3 rankings in M&A league tables previous year, challenging US rival Goldman Sachs which had the top slot.

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